Youth Program

Voting rights for US citizen children born abroad (updated December 2013)

(List updated 8 December 2013 from FVAP website)

As an American citizen born overseas, can I vote?

Voting rights of U.S. citizen children born to Americans while overseas, but having never established residency in the U.S., vary by state.
 
Assuming you are one of these children, it depends on the laws of the state that your parents are voting in from abroad or are living in now.

The list is growing: now 29 states plus the District of Columbia allow these American children who have never lived in the U.S. and/or established U.S. residency to vote.
 
They have effectively passed on the rights given through the Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) to the American citizen children of these voters.
 
If your state is not on the list below:
Unfortunately if neither of your parents is from one of these states, you may be an American citizen who has no voting rights.

 
Until the legislation in the state where you would vote changes, or until there is a federal law to change this, it remains as such, with just these few states allowing voting rights to the children of Americans who previously lived in their states. If you, or the parent is not from one of these states, you can try anyway to register using the parent's old U.S. address -- there is no harm in that -- but no guarantee either.
 
If your parent(s)' state is on the list below:
Eligible American citizen children vote using the address of their American parent(s); if at least one parent votes or was resident in one of these states you can vote.

 
We recommend that qualified voters in this category provide explanatory information showing the connection (ties) to their state and include further documented evidence with their applications, if possible.
 
The voter registration system prompts you for "Additional Information". Use this section to input specifics of your situation. For example:
 
"I am a U.S. citizen who has never lived in the U.S. My U.S. parent [YOUR PARENT'S NAME] is eligible to vote in [YOUR STATE NAME], and I have used the same voting residence claimed by my U.S. parent in [YOUR STATE NAME]."

Alaska
A U.S. citizen who has never resided in the U.S. and whose parents were last domiciled in Alaska is eligible to register to vote as a “Federal voter” and may vote in Alaska.

Arizona
A U.S. citizen who has never resided in the U.S. and whose parent is qualified to vote in Arizona is eligible to register to vote and may vote in Arizona.

California
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad, who is eligible to vote, and who has not previously registered to vote in any other State, may register and vote in the California county where a parent or legal guardian would be eligible to register and vote.

Colorado
Colorado allows citizens who have never resided in the U.S. to register and vote. Colorado law defines these citizens as persons who are citizens of the United States, will be eighteen years of age or older on the date of the next election, and have never been a resident of any state but whose parent is eligible to register and vote in Colorado  (for federal offices only).

 
Connecticut
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the town or city in Connecticut where a parent or legal guardian would be eligible to register and vote.

 
Delaware
A U.S. Citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote (for federal offices only).

 
District of Columbia (Washington D.C.)
A U.S. citizen born abroad who is eligible to vote and has never lived in the U.S. and is not registered to vote anywhere else in the U.S. is eligible to vote at the same voting residence in the District of Columia where a parent or guardian would be eligible to register and vote.

 
Georgia
If a U.S.citizen outside of the US has never lived in the U.S. and either parent is a qualified Georgia voter then, he or she is eligible to register and vote where his or her parent is a qualified voter.

 
Hawaii
U.S.citizens who have never resided in the U.S.but have a parent who is eligible to vote in Hawaii are eligible to vote at the same voting residence claimed by their parent (for local, state and federal office ballots).

 
Illinois
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote. Use the most recent residential address in Illinois of a family member.

 
Iowa
If a U.S.citizen outside the US has never lived in the U.S. and either parent is a qualified Iowa voter then, that person is eligible to register and vote where his or her parent is a qualified voter.

Kentucky
For the 2014 General Election, a U.S. citizen born outside the U.S., who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote where the parent would be eligible to register and vote in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  

Maine
A U.S. citizen who has never lived in the United States, but who has a parent who is a qualified elector in Maine, may register and vote at the address where that parent is a qualified elector.


Massachusetts
U.S.citizens who have never resided in the U.S. but have a parent who is eligible to vote in Massachusetts are eligible to vote at the same voting residence claimed by their parent (for local, state and federal office ballots).

 
Michigan
Michigan allows a U.S. overseas citizen who is 18 years old, not registered to vote anywhere else in the U.S. and who is a spouse or dependent of a Michigan resident to register and vote in Michigan elections even though they have never established Michigan residency.

 
Nebraska
U.S. citizens of voting age who have never resided in the U.S. but have a parent who is eligible to vote in Nebraska, and have not registered to vote in any other state of the U.S., are eligible to register to vote in one county in which either of their parents claimed residence (for local, state and federal office ballots). The citizen must include with the registration a signed form provided by the Nebraska Election Commissioner or County Clerk.

 
New Hampshire
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the town or city in New Hampshire where a parent or legal guardian would be eligible to register and vote.

 
New York
A U.S.Citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote (for federal offices only).

 
North Carolina
A U.S. Citizen who was born abroad and has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the North Carolina county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote (for federal offices only).

 
North Dakota
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to vote (for federal offices only).
Ohio
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the town or city in Ohio where a parent or legal guardian would be eligible to register and vote.
 
Oklahoma
If a U.S.citizen outside the US has never lived in the U.S. and either parent is a qualified Oklahoma voter then, he or she is eligible to register and vote where his or her parent is a qualified voter.

 
Rhode Island
If the person is a U.S.Citizen and has never lived in the U.S. but has a parent who is a qualified Rhode Island elector then, this person will be eligible to register and vote in federal elections.

South Dakota
Any overseas citizen may register and vote in any federal, state, county, or local election held within South Dakota under the following condition: (1) The overseas citizen, or the spouse or parent of the overseas citizen, was last domiciled in South Dakota immediately prior to departure from the United States. 

Tennessee
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register temporarily and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to temporarily register and vote pursuant to this action.

Virginia
A U.S.citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where either parent would be eligible to register and vote.

Washington (State)
A U.S. citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote. They must use the most recent residential address in Washington of their parents.

 
West Virginia
A U.S.citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where either parent would be eligible to register and vote.

 
Wisconsin
A U.S. Citizen who was born abroad and who is eligible to vote and who has never lived in the U.S. may register and vote in the county where a parent would be eligible to register and vote (for federal offices only).

Wyoming
A U.S. citizen who has never resided in the U.S. and whose parent is qualified to vote in Wyoming is eligible to register to vote and may vote in Wyoming.

 

 

 

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